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8.5.2015

Is there time in today's world for humor on signage

Typically, the best practices of signage revolves around identifying with, attracting, and capturing the attention of your target market(s) as quickly as humanly possibly. With attention spans getting shorter, highway speeds getting faster, and attention-holding media become all-the-more portable, the time to capture attention has become shorter than ever.

With the ever-quickening pace by which the world changes, the question begs itself: is there enough time left in the world to use humor on outdoor signage in order to attract attention?

Most of the best jokes are short & sweet

Did you hear the one about the guy whose joke intro was so long that nobody listened? Yeah. Everyone knows that guy. And nobody knows how that joke ends except the guy who keeps failing to tell it.

Society’s entrance into the digital age isn’t the reason why very few listen to long-winded jokes. Most people have loved their humor short and sweet centuries before Burns and Allen were burning up vaudeville stages with their, “Dumb Dora,” act.

”Who?”

Yes. Exactly.

Do you remember those who introduced themselves with a good joke?

Outdoor signage has a tendency to be the initial icebreaker for businesses introducing themselves to customers, specifically new customers. Studies have shown today that even in today’s world, humor attracts attention, earns a positive impression, helps alleviate apprehension, and opens up customers to deepening potential discussions.

The more things change, the more they stay the same

So far, the answer to the question has been the same throughout the generations. From pre-electronic era, the mass media era, and now through the digital era: folks like to laugh. It puts them in a better disposition and shows that your business can truly relate.

Contact us today to make the most of that sweet, sweet time with your sign.

Sources Consulted

experience.com

psychologytoday.com

adage.com

slideshare.net

blogs.scientificamerican.com

enkvillage.com


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